Graduate School training programme

Training for our Graduate School students

Get the most out of your doctoral studies

The Graduate School offers training in a range of topics that will help you to conduct your research and develop your skills as an independent researcher. Additional training is also available to you through other departments and divisions, and services such as IT Services and the Bodleian Library. You also have access to training through Lynda.com

The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) also organises a programme of research, networking and training events each term aimed at those working in the Humanities. 

Michaelmas term 2021

Online workshops and events

The training programme for Michaelmas term is listed below and is also available as a pdf download.

> Download the Michaelmas term card (pdf)

These events are open to all doctoral students of the University of Oxford. Please note that the student exchange networking sessions will be held in person at Rewley House but they will also be live-streamed to enable remote participation for those unable to attend in person. All other technical sessions will be held online using Microsoft Teams and will be recorded and shared to enable wider access. Further details on access and participation will follow subject to University guidelines. The University has provided useful information on the technology recommended for participating in online teaching.

Students from the Department for Continuing Eduction should register by using the sign up tool on the DPhil Handbook, Graduate School Training pages. Students from the wider University should register their interest in a course by emailing Graduate School .

Feedback will be requested from participants, but if you have any initial comments please email the Graduate School.

Programme Schedule (11 Oct – 3 Dec 2021)

Academic Misconduct: What it is and How to Avoid it

Monday 11th October, 15.00-16.30 (GMT)

Tutor: Louise Bezuidenhout

Conducting research that meets the highest standards requires a great deal more than knowledge of one’s subject and good intentions. Questions of research ethics and threats to research integrity arise in all disciplines. This session will explore how your area of research relates to relevant policies, offer guidance on ethical approval, and help you prepare yourself for some challenges you may face.

Student Exchange 1 of 2

Thursday 14th October, 10.30-12.00 (GMT)

Tutor: Alistair Beecher

Remaining part of a connected scholarly community can be difficult when you are researching remotely and independently. This is an opportunity to meet informally with your fellow students to update each other on your respective projects, to share progress and success, and discuss the challenges and barriers you are encountering.

Doctoral Research Seminar

Friday 15th October, 14:00-15:30 (GMT)

These informal seminars are designed to give doctoral students an opportunity to share their research in a supportive environment.

Speakers:

  • Angela Ruiz del Portal (DPhil in Sustainable Urban Development).  Presentation title: Wellbeing, social needs and community facilities in the context of the urban redevelopment of previously industrial land in South Wales. 
  • Craig Paterson (DPhil in Literature and Arts). Presentation title: King Lear and the overwhelming bond between father and daughter in Victorian drama.
  • Rachel O’Driscoll (DPhil English Local History). Presentation title: ‘A stimulus to the whole class to do better work’: London blind, deaf and crippled scholars, 1899-1920

Introduction to Digital Humanities: Part 1, Discussion of Videos 1-4

Thursday 21st October, 14:00-15:00 (GMT)

Tutor: Emma Huber

This course introduces some practical skills so that participants can try out some DH methods for themselves. It covers basic principles of how to model Humanities primary source material as data, and how to produce visualisations using some popular free DH tools. This is a practical course, with optional exercises to complete after each session.

The course consists of eight sessions, each with a short introductory video of around 30 minutes and related optional exercises. There are two Q&A sessions in MT21 to discuss the material in the videos. It is therefore essential to view the videos in advance which can be accessed through this link (see ‘Introduction to Digital Humanities’ towards the bottom of the page).  

https://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/libraries/taylor/services-and-facilities/courses-and-training 

Essential readings:

  • Anon. (2021) Projects, EADH - The European Association for Digital Humanities: https://eadh.org/projects [Accessed 1 March 2021]. 

Academic Writing: Writing as Conversation

Tuesday 26th October, 9.00-12.30 (GMT)

Tutor: Dr Delia Lloyd

This workshop combines best practice thinking with tips and exercises to provide a quick primer on academic writing. We explore the broad principles underlying academic writing – what makes academic writing distinctive, how to situate your argument within a broader literature, and how to write a compelling introduction.

Preparation for Transfer of Status

Monday 8th November,14.00-16.00 (GMT)

Tutors: Claire O’Mahony and Alistair Beecher

This session will consider the practicalities of the transfer process, including the appropriate timing of the application, the required paperwork, the selection of examiners, the respective roles of students and supervisors, the feedback process and possible outcomes. The session will also reflect on the nature of the interview, the kind of challenges to expect and how to make the most out of the opportunity to get some independent input into the direction of the project.

There is no pre-reading required for this session, but a review of the appropriate section of the DPhil Handbook on Canvas would be helpful.

Introduction to Digital Methods. Part 1 of 2

Monday 15 November, 13:00-15:00 (GMT)

Tutor: Dr William Kelly

This course provides an introduction to and overview of general issues and methodological options for conducting social sciences research in digital/online and blended (online and offline) environments. The course is divided into two sessions, the first providing a general and historical overview of engagement between social sciences research and the digital, focusing on key themes and issues, methodological, ethical and otherwise, and the second, focusing on case studies as a means of exploring issues and strategies specific to different online research contexts/environments.

Introduction to Digital Methods. Part 2 of 2

Monday 22 November, 13:00-15:00 (GMT)

Tutor: Dr William Kelly

This course provides an introduction to and overview of general issues and methodological options for conducting social sciences research in digital/online and blended (online and offline) environments. The course is divided into two sessions, the first providing a general and historical overview of engagement between social sciences research and the digital, focusing on key themes and issues, methodological, ethical and otherwise, and the second, focusing on case studies as a means of exploring issues and strategies specific to different online research contexts/environments.

Introduction to Quantitative Data in Research

Tuesday 23rd November,13:00-15:00 (GMT)

Tutor: Dr. Ria Ivandić

This session will introduce students to the fundamentals and advantages of research design using empirical quantitative data. It will start by training researchers to think in terms of empirical concepts and formulate empirically testable research hypotheses. The session aims to provide an introduction to the different types of data that can be used for research, how to search for sources of secondary data, and the various methods of creating your own data. The session will comprise of an informal lecture, followed by a discussion among participants that will involve thinking about how you could use quantitative data in your work, and the opportunities and limitations that you might encounter.

This will be the first of two sessions, followed by a second session which will build upon this learning and introduce quantitative methods to analyse data.

Essential reading:

  • Halperin, S. and Heath, O. (2020) Political research: methods and practical skills. Oxford University Press, USA. 
  • Spiegelhalter, D. (2019) The art of statistics: Learning from data. Penguin, UK. 

Introduction to Digital Humanities. Part 2, Discussion of Videos 5-8

Thursday 25th November, 14:00-15:00 (GMT)

Tutor: Emma Huber

This course introduces some practical skills so that participants can try out some DH methods for themselves. It covers basic principles of how to model Humanities primary source material as data, and how to produce visualisations using some popular free DH tools. This is a practical course, with optional exercises to complete after each session.

The course consists of eight sessions, each with a short introductory video of around 30 minutes and related optional exercises. There are two Q&A sessions in MT21 to discuss the material in the videos. It is therefore essential to view the videos in advance which can be accessed through this link (see ‘Introduction to Digital Humanities’ towards the bottom of the page).  

https://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/libraries/taylor/services-and-facilities/courses-and-training 

Essential readings:

  • Anon. (2021) Projects, EADH - The European Association for Digital Humanities: https://eadh.org/projects [Accessed 1 March 2021]. 

Student Exchange 2 of 2

Friday 3rd December, 16:00-17:30 (GMT)

Tutor: Alistair Beecher

Remaining part of a connected scholarly community can be difficult when you are researching remotely and independently. This is an opportunity to meet informally with your fellow students to update each other on your respective projects, to share progress and success, and discuss the challenges and barriers you are encountering.

 

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