Doctoral Research Seminar: MT21

Part of the Graduate School training programme

The Doctoral Research Seminars are designed to give part-time doctoral students an opportunity to share their research in a supportive environment, with their student peers and interested academic colleagues.

Each seminar will last approximately an hour and a half, and will be chaired by a member of department’s academic staff. It is envisaged that two or three students will speak for 20 minutes each, to be followed by questions, and then a group discussion. Students who are interested in speaking should discuss this in the first instance with their supervisors, and then notify gradschool@conted.ox.ac.uk who will co-ordinate the events.

Michaelmas term 2021 seminar (online)

Open to all Oxford University students and staff. 

Speakers

  • Angela Ruiz del Portal, DPhil in Sustainable Urban Development: Wellbeing, social needs and community facilities in the context of the urban redevelopment of previously industrial land in South Wales. 
  • Craig Paterson, DPhil in Literature and Arts: King Lear and the overwhelming bond between father and daughter in Victorian drama.
  • Rachel O’Driscoll, DPhil English Local History: ‘A stimulus to the whole class to do better work’ - London blind, deaf and crippled scholars, 1899-1920

When and where

Friday 15 October 2021, 2-3.30pm (UK time).

This event will take place online using Microsoft Teams. Joining instructions will be sent via email in advance.

How to register

Students and staff from the across the University can register their interest by emailing the Graduate School. Doctoral students from the Department for Continuing Education should register by using the sign up tool on the DPhil Handbook, Graduate School Training pages.

Abstracts

Angela Ruiz del Portal

Wellbeing, social needs and community facilities in the context of the urban redevelopment of previously industrial land in South Wales 

Both wellbeing and sustainable development are concerned with meeting people’s needs. Thus, it is logical to assume that the integration of these two overarching aims in planning policy in the UK since the 1990s resulted in an increased emphasis on encouraging the meeting of social needs in recent urban regeneration projects. However, literature shows a lack of evidence of this progress together with a lack of comparative studies of urban regeneration before and after the adoption of the sustainable development rhetoric. In planning, social needs may be addressed through the provision of community facilities. This presentation will introduce the preliminary themes that arise from the analysis of project documents, contextual planning policy and initial interviews as part of a historical-comparative study of the framing of wellbeing in the decision-making process for the planning of community facilities in two neighbouring brownfield redevelopments, respectively from the 1960s and 2000s, in South Wales.  

Angela Ruiz del Portal
DPhil in Sustainable Urban Development

Angela is pursuing her DPhil as a Kellogg Scholar, funded by the Oxford-Prince’s Foundation scholarship. Her research explores the changes in the framing of wellbeing in the decision-making process of brownfield redevelopments before and after the introduction of sustainable development rhetoric in the planning policy and practice in South Wales. Angela is an experienced postgraduate teacher in sustainable and urban design in the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University. A fully qualified Spanish architect by the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, she completed her Master’s degree in Theory and Practice of Sustainable Design at Cardiff University, where she began focusing on the sustainable regeneration of the urban environment. Angela has taken part in several international urban development workshops in places such as Cergy-Pontoise (France), Puebla (Mexico), or Yogyakarta (Indonesia).

Craig Paterson

King Lear and the overwhelming bond between father and daughter in Victorian drama. 

The intense father and daughter relationship was the emotional mainspring of nineteenth-century drama. To demonstrate this, my talk analyses Victorian productions of King Lear (c.1606) alongside late-Regency and early-Victorian melodrama, including William Moncrieff’s The Lear of Private Life (1820); and James Sheridan Knowles’ Virginius (1820). These melodramas often depict a mutual bond of overwhelming (and potentially unnatural) affection between father and daughter, which is replicated in Victorian productions of Lear. Crucially, my DPhil explores the idea that theatre and culture are in close reciprocal dialogue with each other and, thus, I argue that this inflated expression of feeling was similarly expressed in correspondences between notable nineteenth-century fathers and daughters. My talk discusses possible reasons as to why this emotional bond between father and daughter was so important to some Victorian audiences. 

Craig Paterson
DPhil in Literature and Arts 

I completed my undergraduate degree in English literature at the Open University, where I graduated in 2016. I then studied for the Master’s in Literature and Arts here at Oxford and, after graduating in 2018, enrolled on its companion DPhil course the following year. My above abstract for this seminar is an extract from my wider thesis, which is a study of the ways that fatherhood is represented in Victorian productions of Shakespeare – so it is an exploration of the relationship between Shakespeare in performance and a range of other fields, including the wider genres and cultures of Victorian theatre; educational theories and values; ideologies of family and domestic structures; child development; and attitudes towards fatherhood. My research topic, then, allows me to combine my two areas interests: ‘Shakespeare’ and ‘Victorian culture’, and I have been fascinated by the questions that a study of this combination has raised.   

Rachel O’Driscoll

‘A stimulus to the whole class to do better work’: London blind, deaf and crippled scholars, 1899-1920 

As the Eugenics movement was hitting its stride and perceived deviations from the norm were being connected to unfitness, physical inefficiency and progressive national decline, the London County Council (LCC) launched an innovative scheme offering scholarships to London-based ‘blind, deaf and crippled’ boys and girls.  The scheme was designed to identify those with ‘artistic capacity, musical talent and manual dexterity’ who had the potential to become ‘good craftsmen’ and ‘efficient’ or ‘successful’ workers and provide them with technical and general education to enable them to earn a livelihood.  This presentation will examine how the LCC perceived these scholars, particularly in the context of fitness, and the impact on scholars and their families. 

Rachel O’Driscoll
DPhil English Local History

Through examining interactions between disabled people, their families and officials, Rachel’s research focuses on the experiences of those with congenital or childhood-acquired disabilities in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century London.  In contrast to the approach of much disability history, source material has been selected which locates disabled people outside the walls of institutions and permits an examination of the experience of families with a disabled member and the strategies they deployed to meet the challenges they faced. 

Rachel’s background is largely in policy and strategy development in the legal services sector.  More recently, she has worked with the Catholic Church in England and Wales on safeguarding children, young people and adults at risk. 

Previous Seminars

Doctoral Research Seminar: TT21

Doctoral Research Seminar: TT21

These informal seminars are designed to give doctoral students an opportunity to share their research in a supportive environment.

Doctoral Research Seminar: HT21

Doctoral Research Seminar: HT21

These informal seminars are designed to give doctoral students an opportunity to share their research in a supportive environment.

Doctoral Research Seminar: MT21

Doctoral Research Seminar: MT21

Informal multidisciplinary seminars by postgraduate students